Adult Hurling League 2 (AHL2) 2018


#141

Most mid-size clubs experience low points like this and swings in fortune when batches come through and go. Often depends on feeder schools and the parents at a certain point in time. It is only the mega-clubs (mostly Southside, Na Fianna, Vincents etc.) that never have these problems.


#142

I remember Na Fianna were intermediate hurling for a long time… Although I can’t see that happening for some time with the increase in standards and influx of players.


#143

It’s perfectly natural for clubs to have dips for a few years and come back when they have one (a couple of) good group(s).

These mega-clubs who are never have these problems, in my opinion, are too big. It comes down to the feeder schools. Some clubs have one, maybe two feeder schools at primary level where others have upwards to ten. Granted they did get their sh*t in order earlier than most other clubs.


#144

Some clubs are too big. But parents nowadays want their kids going to successful clubs, not the clubs that are nearest to them, which is understandable in a way. So the bigger clubs will always attract more players at grass roots level. And from a clubs perspective not many clubs turn away players.

Same at adult level. How many intercounty players when “moving” to Dublin choose to go to a small club?

I do be interested to watch the AIG Dublin club films they have being doing over the last year or so. I watched the Olafs one during the week and they now have 1700 members. That’s serious numbers. Is that the norm for most clubs now or is that way above average?

You are correct about feeder schools and having GPO’s in schools is a bonus. Bigger clubs with the €€€ will get more out of it. I know of one school in particular that is in an area where under the old parish rules the GPO of a football only club can go in to coach as the hurling club do not have a GPO. So straight away the hurling club are potentially losing out on players. I know before the days of GPO’s club representatives went in to try get players but that is not always possible. This could be a factor in kids in that school choosing other clubs for hurling in that area.


#145

St Olaf’s are right beside Crokes who are even bigger. Just heard from a parent today that dur to capacity issues the Crokes Cul Camp has to be moved to Olaf’s grounds to cater for the numbers… I read in the Herald that Ballyboden have 2700 members. Thought I heard that Scoil Ui Chonaill had 400 members when they were advertising their gig in Chicago.


#146

Would be very interested to see the membership figures for the clubs in dublin.


#147

Vins is about 1000 I think. Might be a bit more with ladies football on the rise in the club.


#148

You also need to factor in what type of members… some clubs base their membership numbers on the club registration, others on paid up members. Some clubs have big social membership through golf societies and bar membership etc and others don’t have a clubhouse. Some clubs like Crokes are driving the family membership concept. So a child can’t sign up on their own. Therefore every kid that joins their parents also join. I don’t think all clubs do this though…


#149

It’s great to see large numbers participating in every club. BTW Boden I think have 3200 members. Let’s not get into splitting clubs. There is enough talk of splitting Dublin on other forums as I type.


#150

That’s a fair point. It’d be interesting to see playing members at adult and juvenile level - but I suppose the volume of teams is the real kpi.


#151

That’s why I was surprised to see they had so many members


#152

Was surprised to see the number of teams as well, seems a lot. Good stuff tho!


#153

A good indicator of growth potential for any club is the number of schools that are planned for the area by the Department of Education, as that is based on population growth etc. There was a school opened recently in the St Olaf’s catchment area and there is another planned.


#154

Absolutely. It’s all about participation at the end of the day. Wherr there are additional activities that’s usually a sign of a really big setup. In fairness to Crokes they have a choir, Irish language groups, couch to 5k groups … whether they are liked or not by their competitors they are doing a great job in their community.


#155

Olafs gave a walkover to Whitehall this weekend it seems. Yet to win a game in this League, they seem to be struggling a lot with the Hurling at present but the Football was always very big out there.


#156

They didn’t mention the walkover in the AIG video


#157

That’s mad. They were fairly impressive a couple of years ago at intermediate level.


#158

Unfortunately we have alot of players out injured and away at the min and generally have been missing a number of players all year. As people would know we are a small squad and when your missing 4,5 sometimes 6 first team players its hard going. Plenty of matches left to get things back on track. Olafs abu.


#159

Like ourselves small panel and big push from football this year


#160

I think that is becoming common place now. I think Isles had nearly 30 players togged out for their junior hurling final last year. Between older lads dropping down to the second team, injuries and lads who just gave up they struggle to have a match day squad without the back up of the minor team (which is a bad sign). But this would also stem from some teams doing little or no hurling at juvenile/minor level and no players coming through. Of the lads who finished minor in 2017 no players have played adult hurling at any level. Not many clubs can handle zero players coming through from minor.

As you say @Puck there are plenty of games left for everyone down the bottom to get back on track. 4 wins are normally enough for teams to stay up