Anton O’ Toole

He was the trend setter before multiple All Ireland winners became the norm in Dublin, a huge chunk of my childhood and of our city. What a loss to his family, friends and all of Dublin. Rest easy blue panther!

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A genius on the ball , far too many look back on old footage(tg4) where there was a fair bit of hit n hope and assume all football/footballers where like that, as someone old/fortunate to have seen O Toole at his peak I can say he’s one of the finest to ever lace up his boots , in a time where dirty play was acceptable he rose above the dross and was a sight to behold , never got to meet the man but the footballer was a hero of mine and thousands on the Hill

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Taken far too young. RIP.

RIP The Blue Panther

Before my time but I can only echo what others have said here.

RIP Blue Panther

Rip blue panther, an unassuming legend of Dublin Gaa.

RIP Anton

Most of his career took place before my time going to matches, but the older bro reckons the Dubs wouldn’t have won in '83 without him

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RIP The Blue Panther. There’ll never be another

RIP The Blue Panther.

Gave us so many great memories. R.I.P.

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Anton O’Toole was a footballing giant and a gentleman both on and off the field of play.

The four-time All-Ireland SFC winner was a role model for generation after generation of Dublin footballer.
The Synge Street legend is held in the highest of esteem by the current Dublin management and players, as he has been since he retired from the intercounty game in 1984.
Anton was a brilliant forward who combined bravery, ball-winning ability, team ethic, style and scoring return to grace the playing fields of the country.

He initially played for the Dublin juniors, reaching an All-Ireland final in 1971, before making his senior NFL debut in December 1972 against Longford.

His Championship debut came in the summer of 1974 against Wexford, scoring two points.

It was the start of an illustrious senior career that was to see him win four Celtic Crosses, having played in seven finals, as well as being honoured as an All-Star in 1975, 1976 and 1977.

Anton, or the Blue Panther as he is affectionately known by many supporters, won eight Leinster SFC medals - six in-a-row from 1974 to '79 as well as in 1983 and '84.

In 1983 Anton was one of the main guiding lights that inspired Kevin Heffernan’s young team to All-Ireland glory.

On behalf of Dublin GAA I would like to offer our sincerest condolences to his family and friends. Ar dheis Dé go raibh a anam dilís.

John Costello

Secretary, Dublin GAA County Board

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Very sad to hear.
Ar dheis Dé go raibh do anam a Mhac.

He walked into our classroom, calm, serious, good craic and humble with Sam. Himself and Mick Holden, unexpected and unannounced. Some things in life stay with you. And the boots! RIP Anton O’Toole.

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RIP Big man - taken too soon

I wasn’t born when he was a player so all my memories of him come from when he was the manager of TSS during the time we won the intermediate championship. He brought a belief and a different view to the club which was still very much finding its feet and was lifted to another level. He was a gent of a man but with a great sense of humour and would always enjoy bumping into him at various events in the following years. I don’t have a bad word to say about him nor do any in the club I would bet. Many fond memories and a previous poster mentioning the boots makes me laugh as fairly sure he was still wearing the same ones when he was managing us 25 years later.

Ar dheis de go raibh a anam Tooler

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Great photo @ustix - some of my earliest Dubs memories are of Anton’s grace on the ball and those long legs! One my oul fella’s heroes from the 70’s and, hence one of my own.

RIP Anton.

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We were all twelve feet tall in our socks after meeting him

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A little bit before my time, but having watched some the 70s matches he did move around like a graceful beast

Does anyone know how he got the nickname the “blue panther”? Always been curious about where it came from