The Kickout Rule in Football


#1

Been thinking about the current rules around the kickout. It’s an area that clearly confuses a lot of spectators, although the rules themselves are fairly straightforward. Assuming the keeper takes the kickout, then the follow applies:

  • The kickout must be taken from the 13 metre line
  • All players (defending or opposing) must be outside the 20m line when the ball is kicked
  • All players (defending or opposing) must be at least 13m away from the ball when it’s kicked
  • The ball must travel 13m before being played by another player of the defending team

Sounds simple. The problem is that there is nothing to mark where this 13m exclusion zone actually is, so players and referees alike are left to make an educated guess as to whether they are 13 metres away or if ball has actually travelled 13 metres. Basically if the ball is played diagonally, you’re left trying to apply Pythagoras’ theorem in your head to figure out the point that’s 13m away from the 13m line.

For me, the solution is staring us in the face. There is already an arc (or ‘D’) forming a semi-circle with a radius of exactly 13 metres from the exact centre of the 20 metre line (the penalty spot in hurling). Currently this ‘D’ is only used to ensure players keep the required distance for penalties. If the rule was changed so that all kickouts were taken from the centre of the 20m line and that the ball can;'t go backwards, then the ‘D’ and the 20m line itself become the exclusion zone, so there would be clearly marked lines on the pitch which would make any encroachment obvious to players, officials and spectators.

Given that a penalty kick would be awarded perhaps once every 3 or 4 games whereas you could expect up to 50 kickouts in a typical game, it does seem extraordinary that there are lines marked out on the pitch for the former scenario but not the latter.

This seems such a no-brainer I’m asking myself if I’m overlooking something obvious. Am I?


#2

Sounds simple. The problem is that there is nothing to mark where this 13m exclusion zone actually is, so players and referees alike are left to make an educated guess as to whether they are 13 metres away or if ball has actually travelled 13 metres. Basically if the ball is played diagonally, you’re left trying to apply Pythagoras’ theorem in your head to figure out the point that’s 13m away from the 13m line.

[/quote]

Is this not applied every time there is a free or sideline?


#3

Yes. But my point is that when there’s a clearly marked 13m exclusion zone available, why not use it? Especially as each kickout spot would be used 25-30 times in a typical game.

I’d also argue the consequences of incorrectly penalising the defending team for a short kickout can be pretty drastic. Kerry’s penalty in the 2013 semi-final came directly from a throw ball after we were penalised for a short kickout in a borderline call.


#4

Borderline calls happen all the time, all over the pitch. You win some and you lose some.

With the new rule coming in January the short kickout may be a thing of the past :wink:


#5

It makes absolutely no sense not to take steps to reduce the potential for incorrect calls. And in instances where a player is anything from 11 to 15 metres away from the kick, refs are currently just guessing.

[quote=“niceday2, post:4, topic:1060”]
With the new rule coming in January the short kickout may be a thing of the past :wink: [/quote]

I doubt that, it’s still going to be difficult to cleanly catch the ball in today’s crowded midfields.


#6

I hear what you are saying, but the exact same applies for frees and line balls. The next step to what you are proposing is probably the shaving foam to be used as a marker for each dead ball situation. :slight_smile:


#7

I was thinking more along the lines of a big hula hoop. :wink:


#8

The refs on here would drive you mad, Uroy is talking specifically about kick outs and the fact that there is a ready made exclusion zone, so why not use it? Not sure why you needed to bring frees and sidelines into it when they weren’t mentioned, @niceday2


#9

Could always just do away with the rule of the ball having to travel 13 metres for kickouts…


#10

Why not take kick outs from the edge of the small rectangle (like we used to)? Small rectangle is 4.5m out from the goal line and everyone has to be outside the 20m line so much easier to police. Also no need for additional lines on the pitch.


#11

Maybe it was brought in to highlight the fact that refs are already judging the 13m distance. Uroy was talking about educated guesses, Pythagoras’ theorem and the like when describing the difficulties with the 13m distance from the kickout. Does that clarify it for you???@something_witty


#12

Nope it doesn’t, Uroy was talking specifically about kickouts why bring the discussion somewhere else?


#13

I see this mark is being brought in for college games which are starting over the next few weeks. Be interested to see how much it’s utilised. I seen three trial games this year where it was active and only once was a free awarded from it. Anyway I digress

Not a bad solution Uroy, it’s works seamlessly for ladies football after a score


#14

what are the rules around the mark? Can you play on if you want to and if you do decide to play on when can you be tackled?


#15

“When a player catches the ball cleanly from a Kick-Out without it touching the ground, on or past the 45m line nearest the Kick-Out point, he shall be awarded ‘a Mark’ by the Referee.
The player awarded a ‘Mark’ shall have the options of (a) Taking a free kick or (b) Playing on immediately.

(a) A Free Kick
The player shall signify to the Referee that he is availing of and then take the free kick himself from the hand from the point where he was awarded the ‘Mark’.
Once the player indicates he is taking the ‘Mark’ the Referee will allow up to five seconds for the player to take the kick.
If the player delays longer than five seconds the Referee will cancel the ‘Mark’ and throw in the ball between a player from each side.
Once the player indicates he is taking the ‘Mark’, the opposing players must retreat 10m to allow the player space to take the kick. If an opposition player deliberately blocks or attempts to block the kick within 10m, or if an opposition player impedes the player while he is taking the kick, the Referee shall penalise the opposition by bringing the ball forward 13m.
If the Referee determines that the player who makes the ‘Mark’ has been injured in the process and is unable to take the kick, the Referee shall direct the Player’s nearest team mate to take the kick but he may not score directly from the kick.
(b) Play on immediately
(i) In this circumstance the player may not be challenged for the ball until he carries the ball up to a maximum of four consecutive steps or holds the ball for no longer than the time needed to take four steps and/or makes one act of kicking, hand-passing, bouncing or toe-tapping the ball.
(ii) If he is illegally challenged, a free kick shall be awarded to his team from the point at which the challenge is made, and this free kick may be taken by any player on his team.”


#16

So if a lad catches the ball just on the edge of the 45 they can run unimpeded for 4 steps before anyone can touch them?


#17

Yep


#18

If I remember correctly, and I think we were already using metric by then, it was from the small rectangle after a wide and the 13m line after a score. :older_man:

Upshot is the same. To use existing markings, you take the kick-out back or move it forward. I’ve no real opinion on which would be good or better, but I definitely agree with URoy that there’s no harm in making it simpler to enforce. .


#19

Yip, that used to be the craic alright.

Taking the kick out from the edge of the square would also force most keepers to kick long as kicking across the goal would be deemed to be too dangerous (well it never entered my head when i used to play full back and had a keeper who could not kick the ball out!).

If we kicked all balls out from inside the small rectangle and allowed the keeper kick from the ground or from the hand, with all players having to be outside the 20m line when the ball was kicked and got rid of the rule requiring the ball to travel 13m then we would be left with a much simpler system that also encourages long kick outs.


#20

http://www.gaa.ie/news/the-mark-implemented-higher-education-gaa-senior-football/

Ard Chomhairle have defined the Rule as follows;
When a player catches the ball cleanly from a Kick-Out without it touching the ground, on or past the 45m line nearest the kick out point, he shall be awarded a ‘Mark’ by the Referee. The player awarded a ‘Mark’ shall have the options of (a) Taking a free kick or (b) Playing on immediately.