The Silent Hill

I’ve noticed over the last number of years that the more success we had the quieter the Hill was. Some matches there wouldn’t be a peep out of it. Maybe it was complacency but COYBIB was rarely heard. The raucous summer days with the Hill rocking have disappeared. When we really needed the 16th man last August the Hill watched on largely silent. I know a good few here go to the Hill so I’m wondering what opinions are? Are the Hill crowd oversated? Are there too many ‘tourists’ now - or corporate fans?

It’s definitely not the advantage people thought it was. Always felt that was overstated anyway. Us in the Hogan are far more vociferous than a few daws banging bodhrans. It’s probably time to give full Hill allocations to opposition fans. If we’re not getting any benefit no point in giving the ABDs ammo. Thoughts?

I’d never have an issue with a portion of the hill going to opposition, that said I’m talking a small portion
Equally a full blue hill in full voice is a fine thing to behold
The advantages side of the argument can be argued both ways as in the wilderness years the disappointment of fans I felt effected the players
As to why they have gone quite ? Honestly don’t know probably just taking winning for granted

@Damothedub was the first to reply - well able to hold his own ground.

A fella told me that a big bell was to be erected, up the back, above the wall. Said bell will peal loudly once a day to remind the people of Dublin that the halcyon days are over and All-Irelands will again be like hen’s teeth. I didn’t believe him.

I’d say its down the cost, availability, and distribution of tickets.

Time was hundreds of lads not affiliated with clubs would start queueing outside parnell park at 6 in the morning the thursday before a big game for hill tickets at 5 to 8 quid each. they could do this pretty much all the way up to the all ireland final.

that all stopped around 2003 or so when the whole country got notions, ticket prices started going up - eight quid to 20 euro for hill / nally in only a couple of years - more younger kids started going, and clubs got full allocations with no public sales of terrrace tickets for big games.

As well as the singing and swaying, I remember regular scraps on the hill, a few flag burnings (as recent as the 1999 leinster final the last one I remember), multiple occasions of gardai’s hats being frisbeed, photographers getting one in the head with cans / bottles, a few boobs on display (from lads and lasses!) etc., a major fog cloud of gange, the old pocket piddlers through the rolled up programmes, and almost never any young kids on the hill unless they had a massive da who could “mind them”

So while the atmosphere was definitely wilder, and there was a lot more singing (and variety of songs), I’ll leave it to others to decide whether the more sedate and expensive modern version is on the whole better or not :smiley:

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Like everything good in Dublin, the hipsters got a hold of the Hill too !

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Prawn Sandwiches on the Hill :rofl:

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the price of the pints and food in the huts inside the hill aren’t far off it :roll_eyes:

jaysus back in the 80s we’d about 20 different songs. there seems to be only one now. much better Craic and atmosphere back then. I agree with yer post

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and the odd yuppie porn sambidge

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This thread is alot more silent than the Hill.

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A serious serious lack of competition is a major factor I think too.

We’ve had runs to AIFs with 1 decent game along the way, not much an atmosphere when the only sweat is if your first goalscorer or beat the spread lands

I’ve been away at Dublin league games in Kerry and the atmosphere down there in a tight game in Feb way outstrips the summer cakewalks

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I was there in the 80s as a kid with my Aul lad and through the 90s as a teenager. It has definitely become more civilised now which is not a bad thing in many ways. In the past, I’ve been very embarrassed by a minority of scrotes abusing non dub fans or some of our own abusing our own players. Together with the expansion of football in south Dublin and more middle class attendees, I think Gavin and Gilroy had a civilising effect on player conduct which was reflected in fan composition and behaviour. I suppose the negative is that some of the more raucous behaviour brought atmosphere and could at times be very funny. Whether all the success has dulled the hill goers, we may find out in 2022 coming in as contenders.

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Crowds in general at sports events and concerts too are more sanitised . More women attending games and families as well sitting together which makes people check their language . The hill can still make a noise when required but it has to be a full stadium a final or semi final v Kerry/ Mayo/ Tyrone to get it going. Twas a mad kip in the 80s

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Look at the atmosphere generated especially by the Hill, as well as the rest of the stadium, in the latter stages of important league games in the 2010-2015 period, it’s clear from clips on video that there was plenty of noise at that stage. Later on, any league games Vs Kerry have produced great buzz but not so much alot of other ones I guess, maybe Vs Mayo and a couple of others.

In championship there has been little enough to get thrilled about in Leinster for many years, most All Ire Qtr finals similar, can’t recall a standout Super 8s game in Croker, and in the last few semi-finals only this year and 2019 for half the game was there a real contest

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The last time I was on The Hill was September 24th 1978. A day that will forever live in infamy. It pissed rain all day too.

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I think the heavy losses against Tyrone and Kerry took a lot of wind out of the sails, up till then it was jammers for Leinster finals, but once the crowds slacked off they never really came back except an All Ireland final or an attractive semi

The style of football in 2010 didn’t help. People got used to it in 11 and we were a better team scoring more by then. That plus in 11 people were believing a bit more in the team but there was still alot of doubt that 2010 represented just another false dawn, especially with the league final collapse in early 11

Even though there was only a small crowd the hill really rocked against Armagh in 2010, was like people sensed a change even though we could have lost